Community Presentation
Judy Knight

Judy Knight

Volunteer Program: Cherry Hill 7th Day Adventist Outreach at Jessup Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Ms. Knight started volunteering to bring worship services into the prison. She has been volunteering at JCI for over ten years.

Why Volunteer?: Ms. Knight says the inmates give her spiritual nourishment.

 

 

Judy Knight

Joyce Hargrove

Volunteer Program: Cherry Hill 7th Day Adventist Outreach at Jessup Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Ms. Hargrove has been volunteering for over ten years. She enjoys seeing inmates’ hearts transform through worship.

Why Volunteer?: Ms. Hargrove is inspired by the inmates’ growth and change.

 

 

Judy Knight

Henry Branch

Volunteer Program:  Cherry Hill 7th Day Adventist Outreach at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Volunteer Experience: “The rest of the world shuts down and life seems different when you are here,” said Mr. Branch. He gives back to inmates as a testament to God, he explained that it is something he would want done for him if he were ever incarcerated; however, Mr. Branch does not pity them, he just wants to bring them hope. He is humbled by his experience at JCI.

 

 

Judy Knight

Robert Walker

Volunteer Program: Cherry Hill 7th Day Adventist Outreach at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Experience: He finds it amazing that after being incarcerated for 20-30 years, the inmates still have joy. He boasts about how talented and sensible the inmates are and says that they encourage him.

Why Volunteer?: Mr. Walker says he could have ended up in trouble but the Lord turned his life around, and going to Church is not enough for him so he volunteers at JCI.

 

Judy Knight

Dr. Joshua Miller

Volunteer Program: Volunteer College Program at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Experience: Dr. Miller, a Philosophy Professor at Morgan State University, has been teaching logic classes at JCI since May 2012. He says that his “prison students are the best” and he “likes teaching good students.” He also brought along his colleagues Dr. Daniel Levin of University of Maryland, Dr. Joseph Hall of Morgan State University, and Dr. Mikita Brottman of Maryland Institute College of Art. “As a woman my friends asked if I was afraid to teach in a male prison, but my students here are much more polite,” said Dr. Brottman.

Why Volunteer?: He has always been interested in teaching outside of the classroom and when his colleague introduced him to the JCI Volunteer College Program he got started immediately.

 

Judy Knight

Dr. Joseph Hall

Volunteer Program: Volunteer College Program at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Experience: Dr. Hall, who teaches autobiographical writing, says that he is able to give the angry student a voice though writing. Since teaching Dr. Hall also expresses how his writing has gotten better since he has been volunteering at JCI.

Why Volunteer?: He is amazed that a few seconds in someone’s life can change them.

 

Judy Knight

Edward Sabin

Volunteer Program: Alternative to Violence Program (AVP) at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Experience: Mr. Sabin started volunteering with the Catholic Services in the mid-1990s. Through several volunteer workshops, he got involved with the Alternative to Violence Program (AVP) where he is now a facilitator. Mr. Sabin’s goal is to make his lesson experiential instead of just lecturing about non-violence and human relations. “One of the strengths of the program is that it is all run by volunteers both inside and outside of prisons” says Mr. Sabin. Volunteering is time consuming but the inmates are worth the time.

 

Judy Knight

Ursula Daniels

Volunteer Program: Alternative to Violence Program (AVP) at Jessup Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Ms. Daniels volunteers the Alternative to Violence Program (AVP). Her goal is the give inmates a “creative response to violence.” Her approach has roots in the Civil Rights Movement and New York schools; however, she has emphasis on building human relation skills, skills that most student have but inmates need more training.

 

 

Judy Knight

John Knight

Volunteer Program: Alternative to Violence Program (AVP) at Jessup Correctional Institution

His Experience: Mr. Knight is a self-proclaimed activist who is finding ways to improve society by teaching inmates to live in a community in a civil way through the Alternative to Violence Program (AVP). He feels the inmates are really intelligent and when given the opportunity to improve themselves, they attack it aggressively.

 

 

Gene Cray

Gene Cray

Volunteer Program: Eastern Correctional Institution Religious Services

His Experience: Gene has a lifetime of spiritual strength and a wealth of church ministering experience. A few years ago, Mr. Cray decided to use his skills and compassion in a most unusual way. He became a volunteer to help the chaplains more adequately serve the many faiths represented at the state's largest prison.

Why Volunteer?: "When I was in prison, you did not come to visit me.' That Scripture kept coming back to me. And I know that 'the greatest among you are those who serve.' It's about celebrating life. That's what we're doing. It's great to be a part of the family of people who volunteer and give their time to inmates."

 

Penny Morrow

Penny Morrow

Volunteer Program: Alternatives to Violence at Eastern Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Penny Morrow has served as a deacon in the Episcopal Church and a hospital chaplain. She brings a wealth of beneficial chaplain-like and teaching qualities to Eastern Correctional Institution.

Why Volunteer?: "I consider this a ministry. It has definitely changed lives. The basis of Alternatives to Violence is transforming power, that power we each have in us to make change in our lives. It has been a pleasure. Coming down here has been my heart."

Daniel O'Connor

Daniel O'Connor

Volunteer Program: Eastern Correctional Institution Religious Services

His Experience: Like many volunteers who so greatly help the religious services at state prisons, Mr. O'Connor may not have known that he didn't need two masters degrees or some specialized training when he was first approached about coming into the prison. He already had the most important things: an open mind and a heart to serve. Working with Fr. Edward Aigner, the Roman Catholic priest who serves inmates at Eastern Correctional Institution, Mr. O'Connor has been a valuable asset and someone who comes into the prison so often, it's almost his second home.

Why Volunteer?: "I have been coming since 1996. I came 120 times last year, and I enjoyed every one. You are the only person from the 'real world' that some of these folks get to talk to."

 

Katie Connolly

Katie Connolly

Volunteer Program: Salisbury University Book Discussions at Eastern Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Katie, a Philosophy major at Salisbury University, heard about the program from her professor. As one of the lead students of the volunteer program during her senior year, Katie is clearly passionate about not only the books the group discusses, but about learning something new from the offenders who participate.

Why Volunteer?: “The [book discussion] program allowed me the opportunity to go somewhere I’ve never been and look at life from different perspectives. You think you are there to teach the men about the books, but they end up teaching us about life.”

 

Adrian Justis

Adrian Justis

Volunteer Program: Salisbury University Book Discussions at Eastern Correctional Institution

His Experience: Adrian came to the program as a volunteer when a friend told him about the experience.  A Communications major at Salisbury University in his sophomore year when he started, Adrian’s first visit to prison was a culture shock and a little intimidating.  But following an extensive orientation for volunteers, he decided it wasn’t that scary after all.

Why Volunteer?:“It’s a rewarding experience – take advantage of the opportunity to volunteer because you will learn something.”

 

Dr. Grace Clement

Volunteer Program: Salisbury University Book Discussions at Eastern Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Dr. Clement, a Philosophy professor at Salisbury University, recruits and screens students for Eastern Correctional Institution’s Book Discussion program. A colleague started the program in 2000 and invited her to continue the program in 2002. Over the years she has seen many of her students learn philosophy in a real-life setting through their volunteer experience at the prison. Some have even gone on to start similar programs at other prisons.

Why Volunteer?: “It’s an eye opening experience, your assumptions get challenged but you learn something. Student volunteers discover things they can’t in a classroom.”

 

Daria Bailis

Daria Bailis

Volunteer Program: Salisbury University Book Discussions at Eastern Correctional Institution

Her Experience: A Philosophy major at Salisbury University, Daria sees volunteering with the Book Discussion program as a chance to have an open mind about others.

Why Volunteer?: “I wanted to volunteer because it was a chance to break stereotypes, see the real world and perhaps make a difference.”

 

 

Samantha Livingston

Volunteer Program: Salisbury University Book Discussions at Eastern Correctional Institution

Her Experience: Participating in the Book Discussion program for three years prior to her graduation from Salisbury University as a Philosophy major in 2013, Samantha sought out a career in working with troubled youth based on her volunteer experience. She was even one of a couple students who, upon learning that several offenders at Eastern Correctional Institution didn’t participate in the Book Discussion program because they simply couldn’t read, volunteered to spend extra time to develop a non-readers book group.

Why Volunteer?: “The first year I volunteered to lead a book discussion group there was that one guy who didn’t participate. Then, by the last class, he was the one with stacks of notes and participated more than all the others – just knowing that we made a difference in one person’s life, gave him that space to share his ideas, meant a lot.”

Contact Us

DPSCS Volunteer Programs
410-339-5000
300 E. Joppa Road
Suite 1000
Towson, MD 21286

volunteerinfo@dpscs.state.md.us

Volunteer Requirements

Volunteering is based on your individual skills and interests; however there are a few things all DPSCS volunteers have in common

  • Must be at least 18 years old (21 in facilities)
  • Must not be under current criminal supervision
  • MUST have an interest in making a difference in Maryland’s Public Safety!
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